Discover the secrets of your ancestors’ past
The First World War
Brendan Mullins
Genealogist
Irish Family Research
Tyneside Irish Brigade
(Recruiting Area - Newcastle.  Depot: Alnwick Camp.)

The 25th (2nd Tyneside Irish) Battalion, The Northumberland Fusiliers was a Pals Battalion, raised at Newcastle on the 9th of November 1914, by the Lord Mayor and City. In June 1915 the Battalion joined 103rd Brigade, 34th Division at Ripon and after further training they moved to Salisbury Plain in late August for final training. They proceeded to France in January 1916 where the 34th Division was concentrated at La Crosse, east of St Omer. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture of Scots and Sausage Redoubts, the Battles of Bazentin Ridge and Pozieres Ridge. 103rd Brigade and the Divisional Pioneers also saw action in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette.

In 1917 they fought in the the First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and the the Battle of Arleux during the Arras Offensive. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and in October they took part in the Third Battles of Ypres at the Broenbeek.

On the 3rd of February 1918 they transferred to 102nd Brigade, still with 34th Division. In 1918 they were in action in the Battle of St Quentin and then moved to Flanders seeing action in the Battle of Estaires, the Battle of Bailleul and the First Battle for Kemmel Ridge during the Battles of the Lys, suffering heavy losses. The 34th Division was then withdrawn from fighting and on the 21st of April they moved to the area west of Poperinge for reorganisation and was engaged in digging a new defensive line between Abeele and Watou. On the 13th of May the infantry units moved to the area around Lumbres and reduced to a cadre which was then employed in the training of newly arrived American troops. On the 17th of June 1918 they were transferred to the 116th Brigade, 39th Division and on the 29th July 1918 to the 197th Brigade, in the reforming 66th Division. They returned to action in October in the Battle of Cambrai and the Pursuit to the Selle. They fought in the Battle of the Selle and on the 21st of October the Division was withdrawn for rest, moving to the Serain area. On the 2nd of November they advanced through Le Cateau engaging in sharp fighting. On the 9th of November a number of units of the Division were selected to advance through Belgium to occupy the Rhone Bridgeheads and were placed under command of Bethell's Force. At the Armistice the advanced units of this Force were on the line of Pont de Republique through Grandrieu to Montbliart. They advanced into Germany and remained there until demobilised.

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The 26th (3rd Tyneside Irish) Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers was a Pals Battalion, raised at Newcastle in November 1914, by the Lord Mayor and City. After initial training near home they joined the 103rd Brigade, 34th Division at Ripon in June 1915 and after further training they moved to Salisbury Plain in late August for final training.

They proceeded to France in January 1916, where the Division concentrated at La Crosse, east of St Omer. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture of Scots and Sausage Redoubts, the Battles of Bazentin Ridge and Pozieres Ridge. 103rd Brigade and the Divisional Pioneers also saw action in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette.

In 1917 they fought in the the First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and the the Battle of Arleux during the Arras Offensive. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and in October they took part in the Third Battles of Ypres at the Broenbeek.

In early 1918 the army was reorganised and the 3rd Tyneside Irish were disbanded on the 3rd of February 1918 in France, teh troops transferring to other units.

The 24th (Service) Battalion (1st Tyneside Irish), The Northumberland Fusiliers was a Pals Battalion, raised at Newcastle on 14 November 1914, by the Lord Mayor and City. After initial training near home, they joined 103rd Brigade, 34th Division at Ripon in June 1915 and after further training they moved to Salisbury Plain in late August for final training.

They proceeded to France in January 1916, where the division concentrated at La Crosse, east of St Omer. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture of Scots and Sausage Redoubts, the Battles of Bazentin Ridge and Pozieres Ridge. 103rd Brigade and the Divisional Pioneers also saw action in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette.

In 1917 they fought in the the First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and the the Battle of Arleux during the Arras Offensive. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and on the 10th they amalgamated with 27th Battalion to form the 24/27th Battalion.

The 27th (Service) Battalion (4th Tyneside Irish), the Northumberland Fusiliers was a Pals Battalion, raised at Newcastle in January 1915, by the Lord Mayor and City.After initial training near home, they joined the 103rd Brigade, 34th Division at Ripon in June 1915 and after further training they moved to Salisbury Plain in late August for final training.

They proceeded to France in January 1916, where the division concentrated at La Crosse, east of St Omer. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture of Scots and Sausage Redoubts, the Battles of Bazentin Ridge and Pozieres Ridge. 103rd Brigade and the Divisional Pioneers also saw action in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette.

In 1917 they fought in the the First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and the the Battle of Arleux during the Arras Offensive. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and on the 10th they amalgamated with the 27th Battalion to form the 24/27th Battalion.

Irish Heroes in the War

The Tyneside Irish Brigade

by T. P. O’Connor M.P., Joseph Keating and Felix Lavery

 

The story of the raising of the Tyneside Irish Brigade in the Great War with complete nominal roll of the brigade by companies and service details of officers.

This is a the story of the origin and development of the Tyneside Irish Brigade ending with a brief and highly imaginative account of the 1st July 1916. Locally the four battalions were known as 1st - 4th Tyneside Irish, officially they were the 24th - 27th Northumberland Fusiliers, likewise the brigade's designation was the 103rd, part of the 34th Division.

This is more than a history, it is an extremely useful reference work in that it includes alphabetical lists of officers of the brigade, with biographical details, along with lists of tne NCOs and men, all shown by battalion and by company within each battalion. These are accompanied by group photos of officers and NCOs of each battalion with individuals numbered and identified, and groups of officers and men of each battalion.

Tyneside Irish

24th, 25th, 26th and 27th. (Service) Battalions of Northumberland Fusiliers

By John Sheen

Pen & Sword Books, England

 

The ‘Pals” battalions were a phenomenon of the Great War. Local communities raised (and initially often paid for) entire battalions for service on the Western Front. Their experience was all too frequently tragic, and they encountered the fury of battle on the Somme in July 1916. Yet their spirit and fighting qualities have gone down into history.

This is a comprehensive history of the Tyneside Irish Brigade raised in the North East. It covers their raising, training and active service as well as the aftermath of the war and how it affected their community.

Books
Available in the National Library of Ireland
Main Reading Room
NLI Call No.  3A 3873
Available in the National Library of Ireland
Main Reading Room
NLI Call No.  10B 1908
A CD containing pictures and biographies
Of soldiers who earned the Victoria Cross
Or honours. These include background,
Career and family information with details
On the circumstances in which their awards
Were earned.
Also included is an extensive history and a
Who’s Who of the Tyneside Irish.

S&N Genealogy Supplies, England
www.genealogysupplies.com
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